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Kaju-ji
Name:Kaju-ji 



 
Alternate Name:Kanshu-ji, Kanshuji, Kajuji 
Address:27-6 Niodo-cho, Kanshuji, Yamashina-ku 
Mailing Address: 
City:Kyoto-shi 
State:Kyoto-hu 
Postal Code:607 
Country:JAPAN 
Latitude/Longitude:lat=35.9667; long=135.8167
Find Gardens Nearby
Phone:+81.(0)75-571-0048 
Fax: 
E-Mail: 
Contact: 
Designer(s): 
Contruction Date:900 
Public/Private:PUBLIC 
Hours:Open daily, 9am - 4pm 
Admission:admission: 400-200; groups: 320-160 
Added to JGarden:3/16/2002 
Last Updated:3/16/2002 
JGarden Description:A temple has existed on this site from as early as 900 AD. Today, it is the headquarters temple of the Yamashina school of Shingon Buddhism. The large pond here, also known as hamuro-no-ike is the main attraction of this garden. While today it is known for its lotus, water lilies and irises, originally, this was probably the main element of a much larger pond and hill garden on the estate of Miyamichi Iemasu, a member of the Heian aristocracy and connected through marriage to the powerful Fujiwara family.

The temple was estroyed in 1470 during war and then later restored by the Tokugawa family and the Imperial Household. Successive head priests have been drawn directly from the Imperial family. Mito Mitsukuni (popularly known as Mito Komon) is said to have donated the stone lantern in front of the Shoin.

The garden would originally have been used for boating and poem-writing parties, but today one can still stroll through the site.

Take the Kyoto Subway Tozai Line: Ono Station - walk 6 minutes
Free parking: 8 buses & 50 cars
Wheelchair accessible 




Earth, mountains, rivers -- hidden in this nothingness.
In this nothingness -- earth, mountains, rivers revealed.
Spring flowers, winter snows;
There is no being nor non-being, nor denial itself.

  Saisho

©1996-2002, Robert Cheetham; ©2018 Japanese Garden Research Network, Inc.
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