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Nijo-jo (Nijo Castle)
Name:Nijo-jo (Nijo Castle) garden photo
Nijo Castle
Photo: Alan Tarver



 
Alternate Name:Ninomaru Teien, Honmaru-jo, Nijojo 
Address:Nakagyo-ku, Nijo-jo-cho 
Mailing Address: 
City:Kyoto-shi 
State:Kyoto-hu 
Postal Code: 
Country:JAPAN 
Latitude/Longitude:lat=35; long=135.75
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Phone: 
Fax: 
E-Mail: 
Contact: 
Designer(s):Kobori Enshu 
Contruction Date:1602, renovated 1624-26 (Edo period) 
Public/Private:PUBLIC 
Hours:8:45am - 4pm, closed Dec 26 - Jan 3 
Admission: 
Added to JGarden:1/1/1996 
Last Updated:10/22/2001 
JGarden Description:Built by Tokogawa Ieyasu, the first of the Tokugawa shoguns, it was intended as a residence but quickly abandoned when the family relocated to Edo (Tokyo). After the Meiji restoration in 1868, Nijo became an imperial villa but it was given to the City of Kyoto in 1939.

Iemitsu (3rd Tokugawa shogun) was responsible for hiring Kobori Enshu to renovate the garden and expand the buildings in 1624 in preparation for a visit by Emperor Gomizuno(1596-1680). This renovation was not the last, however, and Ninomaru Teien has undergone several alterations since then. At times the large, central lake has been a 'dry garden' though it is not known if this was the original design. The garden is about one acre in size and lies southwest of the castle, itself.

It is possible to stroll in the garden, but the best views were designed to be seen from the buildings.

There is an older section, called Honmaru-jo, on the western half of the site; only the foundation of the remains after it burned in the 1800's 




Not yet having become a Buddha,
This ancient pine-tree,
Idly dreaming.

  Issa
  trans. by R.H. Blyth

©1996-2002, Robert Cheetham; ©2017 Japanese Garden Research Network, Inc.
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